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#26 2006-08-25 12:52:53

_nycaaz
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Memories

Wow, don't get me started ,  But, do not remember the pet store, I loved the german deli on 222 st and  Newcome's candy store 220st on the corner from the movies. And guess what my brand new bike was stolen from there when I was 12.
Played stickball every day at 147 and then Colin Field. Left the house early and came home when it got dark.
Rode bike everywhere..parents shopped at A&P, library across street.
Roberts Drugs @ 219st.
Chinese Rest 218st
Could go on and on but my hangout was Newcome's egg cream and penny candy.
Unfortunately I still have a sweet tooth.

 

#27 2006-08-25 12:56:50

_nycaaz
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Memories

Yes Gouz in elmont sure,, still had cows when I was small.. Bottled Milk.
but mostly at Lanes on Springfield Blvd. Was in a kids league there.
Speaking of Elmont, Walcliff roller Skating??

I have to stop my brain hurts

 

#28 2006-08-25 13:18:18

_soulfulsteve
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Skating

Yep, Walfcliff. Spent lots of time there. We skated to an organist. D'OH!!!

When I was in CH, I was friends with the family that ran the shoe repair on I think Linden and 228th st. They were so good they coulc even repair sneakers. If I'm not mistaken they were also related to the guys who ran the pizza shop on Linden and 221st St.

How bout the Boy's Club?

 

#29 2006-08-25 14:39:21

_nycaaz
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Memories

Many times I have told my kids about that pizza place on 221st. I rmember it well
they cannot believe it was 15 cents a slice.That might have been before your time I am 56.
But my favorite pizza of all time...believe it or not the Jamaica bus terminal.

 

#30 2006-08-25 15:19:01

_soulfulsteve
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Pizza

It was like 25 cents when I started there. And the Jamaica Bus Terminal pizza was great but what about the donuts? Remember the fresh donuts at the terminal.

One day a few years ago I had to go to the dentist. I still use Dr. Seaman on Linden and 228th St. He died but I now see his son. Anyway I took the train to Queens and then walked over to the terminal. No terminal. Everything is at Archer Ave near Parsons Blvd.

D'OH!

I still go to CH every now and then, Still have friends on my old block.

 

#31 2006-08-25 15:25:59

_nycaaz
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Memories

Life must have been good in those days if we can have great memories about a bus terminal.

 

#32 2006-09-26 20:43:58

_rezimet@aol.com
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

more memories

I grew up on 224th and graduated Jackson in '66.  My CH memories include stickball at PS 147, crosscourt, the Cambria Heights Little League (colin field), italian ices at Levy's, G&S Drugs (worked as a delivery boy), Jack's, Ato Z, Dr. Seaman the dentist (who did not know of novocaine as I remember it, still painfully, riding my bike to Idlewild, leaving it at terminal doors, unlocked, and wandering around inside and then biking home, Rabbi Shevelowitz (spelling?) and foremost of all, 4 wonderful years coming of age at Jackson.

 

#33 2006-10-11 02:15:37

_anon.
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

To Bob Zimet

I was quite surprised to read your post of 9/26/06.  It is quite likely that you are the most prominent member of AJHS class of 1966.  However, the class of 1967 (two Harvard Med Graduates, a Johns Hopkins Med Graduate, a Harvard law professor (Lani Guinier), a CEO of a major Texas hospital, a member of the US delegation to the UN, etc) did surpass the class of 1967.  Now, while there were good teachers at Jackson, it was the quality of the students themselves, not the teachers.
    Incidentally, I remember your speech for Bill Buckley in the Jackson assembly in 1965, quite a good speech.
    Rabbi Schevelowitz is long gone (he married me and I still am married, by the way).  It was Colden Field (named after the judge), to refresh your memory.
    Your block had the most vile group of anti-semitic little thugs, but you never had to walk to the southern end of your block.


   

 

#34 2006-10-11 02:17:58

_anon.
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Correction to previous msg

a typo...meant that the class of 1967 surpassed the class of 1966.

 

#35 2006-10-12 18:52:59

_flowers
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Rockaway Beach 35th street

Anyone hang out on Rockaway Beach 35th street especially those who lived in Cambria Heights?

 

#36 2006-10-18 00:16:38

_jimstander
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Anon-of course

Anon...what a sad old man you are...probably were a sad child as well.

Your insecurites come pouring forth in your words of unhappiness
BTW it WAS Colen Field, but why do I get the feeling you were rarely there.

 

#37 2006-10-22 23:16:42

_steven
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

ch

I did not grow up in CH, but spent an awful lot of time there in the  60's through the 70's. my aunt and uncle were some of the first black people to move into CH. When I was old enough, my parents would let me stay there on the weekends. I thought CH was a great place, except for the time that some white kids chased me around the corner while I was riding my bike calling me the N word. I found it interesting that it was a white lady who came out of her house and chased them away and made sure that I was alright. To a boy from Bushwick, CH weekends were great. The shops with great ice cream, the movies ( I remember when they built a lot of things in CH), the little library my aunt and uncle took me to in the summer when I was there during the week, being amazed at riding my bike over the little "bridge" into Long Island, Gouz in elmont and the animals there, and so on.

I now am a pastor at a Church in St. Albans, and moved there three years ago. I ride down Linden just remembering how it was "back in the day."

 

#38 2006-10-26 11:10:22

_prevresident
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Dr. Fine

Funny you should ask about Dr. Fine.  Just the other day I thought about him and googled him.  Unfortunately, I found a death notic in the NY Times from 1999.  He was the true family doctor.

 

#39 2006-11-06 21:50:22

_bobmitchell
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

WHY?

I grew up in CH from 1955-1969
ps147 Kindergarten
Sacred Heart 1-8
What a town, a movie should be made..all white for its first 40 years then in 1966 the start of "block-busting", white flight and all black since...WHY??

And why do those of us who return every ten years or so become outraged at the site of Linden...the bars the chains on all the doors and windows of the places we would go to as children. When there was no thought of problems in the neighborhood. The security bars on house windows. Why?
Then stores closed forever. The theater shut down...Why? The crime?Why?  What happened to OUR hometown?....

It is so sad, so sad

 

#40 2006-11-13 22:47:36

_tommyd
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Soulfulsteve

WoW I haven't been back at this site in quite some time, but you brought back some memories. My route was on the other side of Linden. Right across from Sams' Bicycle Shop Holy Smokes I forgot about that one. I worked in a TV shop on 229 th St and unfortunately just ran into the obit of the guy who gave me a start into electronics. Right now I am craving a Drakes Coffee Cake ( You can't get them here in Florida)from that German Deli across the street from the Bab-Ric Tavern.  I used to live in an apt behind the TV store on 225 Street and Linden. I don't think that I remember you, but I got my butt kicked more than once as I was always the shortest around, and I guess an easy target.

Oh yeah There was Sams candy store as well on 223rd St (across from Bohak). I still remember all the candy that I would gobble up, sneaking away from school at lunch to buy some. My email address is somewhere in an earlier post.

 

#41 2006-11-14 00:00:38

_pattylennon
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Cambria Heights

To Christopher Milius - l remember your house on 227th
- a tudor.  I can't remember whether it was attached or
not.  But it was very dark and mysterious inside and I
remember turning the lights out and sneaking around,
looking for cigarette butts to smoke - my first.  What
about the barber shop between 227th and 228th, as well
as Sam's, Newcomb's and best of all, John's Deli on Linden
and 221st, which sold the best 15 cent baloney hero (20
cents for ham and cheese) and a half pound of shells (with
cold Italian sauce) was only 10 cents.  I also remember
Mary Weiss' song that to this day gives me a rise (in more
ways than one.)  Your brother also dated one of the
prettiest girls in CH - was it Chis Kenny's sister, or Eddie
McCarthy's - can't remember.  I lived on 225th and 118th
Avenue, down the block from Lorraine Luzinski and Eddie
Galgano and on the same block as the Dineens and the
Murrays.  Sister Denis Joseph, Big John, Father McVernon
and Monsignor Hanrahan.  The Tablet being hawked
outside the church on Sunday mornings, and crumb buns
at the bakery on 223rd, next to Sam's and across the
street from the vacant lot that was next door to Levy's
Sweet Shop.  Hunter's on Linden and 232nd, where I'd
save up to buy woolen sweatsocks with different colored
stripes and bought my first poncho shirt for the class trip
in '62 to Rye Beach - though I could never be as cool as
Freddie Panico or hope to date Diane Donnelly.  Those
were the days 

 

#42 2006-11-26 03:56:54

_cmillius
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Cambria Heights

To Patty Lennon-
It was great bringing back those memories. I can still taste the heros and shells from John's Deli on Linden. My brother Mike married Eileen Mc Carthy, Eddie's sister.

 

#43 2006-12-08 19:49:51

_rezimet@aol.com
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

cambria heights and anon

Anon.

I might take a guess who you are.  If you are who I think, I remember a  pretty spirited, articulate 224th streeter as well.  And I remember some interesting, protracted discussions about politics etc.  You remember a speech I gave for Bill Buckley.  I cringe now to think about my naive political views of that age.  Feel free to write to me at my aol address in confidence.

 

#44 2007-02-03 01:03:07

_cmillius
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Cambria Heights

I remember Colen Field. I just can't remember where it was located. Does anyone remember Cherry Woods?

 

#45 2007-02-03 17:38:52

_stutz
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

1960

Colin Field was at 220th st and 119 ave and Francis Lewis

I forgot where Cherry Woods was though

theres a name I remember,played CYO w McCarthy.
Cold shells from Johns deli and an egg cream from Newcome's...classic!!!

 

#46 2007-02-03 18:52:54

_rezimet
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

cherry woods

If I recall correctly, cherry woods was  wooded area at the intersection of the Southern State and the Cross County...but I am not positive

 

#47 2007-03-08 00:24:21

_cmillius
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

cambria heights

Does anyone remember Twin Ponds? Do you remember where they were?

 

#48 2007-03-09 15:04:06

_currentresident
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Cambria Heights Oueens

I stumbled upon this site and quickly became fascinated by the historical antedotes concerning Cambria Heights. I was raised in the town and currently own the family home that I grew up in. I am a respected attorney and I happen to be African American. I too remember Cambria Heights in the 1960s and 70s.  When my parents bought their home it was the begining of "white flight"  We were the 2nd black family to move on to the 114 block of 209th street.  As a child I recall one white family after another leaving while yet another middle class black family moved in.  The economic status of the new families was no different from those who left. These were proud people who were looking to make a better life for their famlies.  By the mid 1970s our block was all black and every family was headed by both a mother and father working hard to send their kids to college or beyond.  Further, the overwelming majority of kids raised by those families went on to college, grad school or more. I was raised by teachers, police officers,entertainers, doctors, lawyers and civil servants.  For those of you who left, you can not adequately judge a neighborhood from the outside.  As with any NYC neighborhood, the 1980s were rough. However, things hove improved dramatically and like most towns in Queens Cambria Heights is much better.  The real lesson here is that Cambria Heights would likely have enjoyed the status of Floral Park, Forest Hills or Little Neck but for the fact that so many white folks feared the unknown back in the 60s and 70s. We need to live together so that our neighborhoods thrive on the positive aspects of all cultures. Indeed, we would have all benefited by your hardworking parents and neighbors working together with those who raise my friends and me. Lets hope that we have learned our lesson as Cambria Heights and other NYC neighborhoods continue to transform.           

 

#49 2007-03-09 15:04:06

_currentresident
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Cambria Heights Oueens

I stumbled upon this site and quickly became fascinated by the historical antedotes concerning Cambria Heights. I was raised in the town and currently own the family home that I grew up in. I am a respected attorney and I happen to be African American. I too remember Cambria Heights in the 1960s and 70s.  When my parents bought their home it was the begining of "white flight"  We were the 2nd black family to move on to the 114 block of 209th street.  As a child I recall one white family after another leaving while yet another middle class black family moved in.  The economic status of the new families was no different from those who left. These were proud people who were looking to make a better life for their famlies.  By the mid 1970s our block was all black and every family was headed by both a mother and father working hard to send their kids to college or beyond.  Further, the overwelming majority of kids raised by those families went on to college, grad school or more. I was raised by teachers, police officers,entertainers, doctors, lawyers and civil servants.  For those of you who left, you can not adequately judge a neighborhood from the outside.  As with any NYC neighborhood, the 1980s were rough. However, things hove improved dramatically and like most towns in Queens Cambria Heights is much better.  The real lesson here is that Cambria Heights would likely have enjoyed the status of Floral Park, Forest Hills or Little Neck but for the fact that so many white folks feared the unknown back in the 60s and 70s. We need to live together so that our neighborhoods thrive on the positive aspects of all cultures. Indeed, we would have all benefited by your hardworking parents and neighbors working together with those who raise my friends and me. Lets hope that we have learned our lesson as Cambria Heights and other NYC neighborhoods continue to transform.           

 

#50 2007-03-14 12:03:53

_formerajhighstude
Guest

Re: cambria heights, Queens

CAMBRIA HTS

UPON READING THE READING THE ARTICLE FORM A CURRENT CAMBIRA HTS RESIDENT I HAD TO REPLY.  I LIVED IN QUEENS VILLAGE AND HAD TO ATTEND ANDREW JACKSON BECAUSE OF REZONING. I UNDERSTAND YOUR COMMENTS ABOUT THE WHITE PEOPLE MOVING OUT OF THE NEIGHBORBOOD.  I THINK IT WAS THE FRIGHT OF WHAT WAS HAPPENING IN THE AREA AND THE HIGHT SCHOOL. MY IN-LAWS ALSO MOVED OUT. I HAVE TO TELL YOU THAT IT WAS A VERY SCARY TIME TO BE AT THAT HIGH SCHOOL AND JUST WALK TO THE BUS TO GET HOME. I WAS ROBBED, BEAT UP AND IT DID NOT LEAVE A GOOD MEMORY WITH MANY OF MY CLASSMATES. WE WERE TRAUMATIZED 14 YEAR OLDS.
WE HAVE NEVER HAD A CLASS REUNION AND I NEVER WANTED MY CHILDREN TO SUFFER AS WE DID.  ATTENDING AFTER SCHOOL ACTIVIES WAS A NO NO UNLESS YOU HAD PROTECTION TO GET HOME.
I HOPE THINGS HAVE IMPROVED SINCE.

 

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