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Current and Upcoming Forums at the Gotham Center

The History Forums are still FREE, but you are now required to register. Please follow the link at the specific forum you wish to attend. Seating is limited.

Unless otherwise noted, all forums take place at the CUNY GRADUATE CENTER - 365 5th Avenue at 34th Street.

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The Day Wall Street Exploded: A Story of America in its First Age of Terror
Tuesday, February 24, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – Recital Hall
To Register click here

Just after noon on September 16, 1920, a horse-drawn cart packed with dynamite exploded on Wall Street. Thirty-nine people died and hundreds more lay wounded, making the Wall Street explosion the worst terrorist attack to that point in U.S. history. In The Day Wall Street Exploded, Yale University historian Beverly Gage tells the story of that once infamous but now largely forgotten event. The book delves into the lives of victims, suspects, and investigators: world banking power J.P. Morgan, Jr.; labor radical “Big Bill” Haywood; anarchist firebrands Emma Goldman and Luigi Galleani; “America’s Sherlock Holmes,” William J. Burns; even a young J. Edgar Hoover. It examines the rise of the Bureau of Investigation, the federal campaign against immigrant “terrorists,” the grassroots effort to define and protect civil liberties, and the establishment of anti-communism as the sine qua non of American politics.

 


 

 

 

Gastropolis: Food and New York City
Wednesday, March 11, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – C203/204/205
To Register click here


2Gastropolis: Food and New York City, edited by CUNY professors Annie Hauck-Lawson and Jonathan Deutsch,explores the personal and historical relationship between New Yorkers and food. Beginning with the origins of cuisine combinations, such as Mt. Olympus bagels and Puerto Rican lasagna, the book describes the nature of food and drink before the arrival of Europeans in 1624 and offers a history of early farming practices. Essays trace the function of place and memory in Asian cuisine, the rise of Jewish food icons, the evolution of food enterprises in Harlem, the relationship between restaurant dining and identity, and the role of peddlers and markets. The essays share recollections of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx, and colorful vignettes of the avant-garde chefs, entrepreneurs, and patrons who continue to influence the way New Yorkers eat. Essayists will read and discuss their contributions to the book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

From The Triangle To The Tiger:  New York's Garment Center in American Popular Culture, 1920-1970.
Thursday, March 19, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – Recital Hall
To Register click here

 

3Sponsored by the Leon Levy Foundation’s Garment Industry History Initiative

Warren Shaw will give an original, 50-minute illustrated talk about the Garment District and popular culture. This discussion of the Garment Center will examine the years circa 1920s through the1970s and will cover plays, movies, novels, and books related to the famous neighborhood.

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of 42nd St: The Theatres, Shows, Characters and Scandals of the World’s Most Notorious Street
Monday, March 30, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – Recital Hall
To Register click here

Sponsored by the Old York Library

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This book, by Mary C. Henderson and Alexis Greene, documents the rise and fall of the street's historic theatres, and the street's comeback as an entertainment center. Confirmed panelists include Alexis Greene, author; Craig Morrison, theatre architect and historian; Howard Kissel, journalist, The Daily News; Milly Baranger, Distinguished Professor Emerita, Theatre Department, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Lynn Sagalyn, Professor of Business and Real Estate, Columbia University; Marshall Berman, Distinguished Professor, Political Science, CUNY-Graduate Center.

 

   
 

The Role of Public History in NYC’s Cultural Life
Monday, April 6, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – 9th Floor
To Register click here

3Co-sponsored with American Social History Project.

This forum will look at the role public history plays in the cultural life of New York City. Speakers include: Ruth Sergel, film maker and artist, creator of CHALK – an annual commemoration of the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire; Dave Herman, Fire Fighter and Founder, The City Reliquary; Ron Grele, Professor Emeritus, Columbia University; Oneka LaBennett, anthropologist at Fordham University’s Bronx African American History Project; Deborah F. Schwartz, President, Brooklyn Historical Society.

 

   
 

Some Time in the Sun (work-in-progress): Sneak Peek Reading with John Sayles
Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – Recital Hall
To Register click here

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Sponsored by the Old York Library

Please join award-winning film maker, screenwriter, actor and novelist John Sayles for a sneak preview reading of his forthcoming novel tentatively entitled Some Time in the Sun. The historical novel is set between 1898-1901 during the last gasp of Reconstruction and the onset of American Imperialism) It includes material set in the New York of that period -  Hell’s Kitchen, Newspaper Row, the lower East Side, Brooklyn just after it was annexed, Barren Island, and Coney Island!

 

 

 

The Sun and the Moon: The Remarkable True Account of Hoaxers, Showmen, Dueling Journalists and Lunar Man-Bats in Nineteenth-Century New York
Tuesday, May 5, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – Recital Hall
To Register click here

The Sun and the Moon: The Remarkable True Account of Hoaxers, Showmen, Dueling Journalists and Lunar Man-Bats in Nineteenth-Century New York Tuesday, May 5, 2009, 6:30 p.m. – Segal Theatre      Join author Matthew Goodman for a book talk and signing of ThJoin author Matthew Goodman for a book talk and signing of The Sun and the Moon: The Remarkable True Account of Hoaxers, Showmen, Dueling Journalists and Lunar Man-Bats in 19th Century NY (Basic Books). Goodman discusses the NY Sun’s 1835 “moon series” which became an overnight success and opens a window into a time when a new kind of newspaper was born.

   
 

 

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